Dr. LeFlouria has also made on-camera appearances on C-SPAN (American History TV) and in several PBS documentaries including Slavery by Another Name which was a finalist for the Sundance Film Festival Documentary Award.

Talitha L. LeFlouria is Associate Professor of History and Fellow of the Mastin Gentry White Professorship in Southern History at The University of Texas at Austin. She is a nationally recognized historian and a leading expert on black women and mass incarceration.

Professor LeFlouria is the author of the multi-award-winning Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), the first history of black, working-class incarcerated women in the post-Civil War period. This book received six prizes from: The Organization of American Historians; the Association of Black Women Historians; the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History; the Georgia Historical Society; the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians; the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations and the Labor and Working-Class History Association. She is currently finishing her second single-authored monograph, Searching for Jane Crow: Black Women and Mass Incarceration in America (forthcoming from Beacon Press). The Carnegie Corporation supported this project with a prestigious Andrew Carnegie fellowship 2018-2020.

In addition to her scholarly publications, Professor LeFlouria writes for popular media outlets, including The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and The Root. Her scholarship has been featured in Ms. Magazine, Huffington Post, The Nation, For Harriet, and ColorBlind Magazine. She has appeared on several local and nationally syndicated radio programs and online podcasts such as: This is Hell!, Female View Broadcast, News Talk WCHB, Left of Black, Labor History Today, Working History, and The African History Network. Dr. LeFlouria has also made on-camera appearances on C-SPAN (American History TV) and in several PBS documentaries including Slavery by Another Name which was a finalist for the Sundance Film Festival Documentary Award. She will appear in the forthcoming RUST documentary, about income inequality in Newark, NJ. Professor LeFlouria serves as a historical consultant for several non-profit organizations, museums, and historical societies. She is particularly committed to organizations that serve formerly incarcerated women transitioning back into full citizenship.

Awards & Distinctions

  • 2018-2020 Andrew Carnegie Fellow, Carnegie Corporation of New York
  • 2016 Darlene Clark Hine Award, Organization of American Historians
  • 2015 Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize
  • 2016 Philip Taft Labor History Award, Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations / Labor and Working-Class History Association
  • 2016 Malcolm Bell, Jr. and Muriel Barrow Bell Award, Georgia Historical Society
  • 2015 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize, Association of Black Women Historians
  • Ida B. Wells Tribute Award, Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

Chained in Silence

Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South

In 1868, the state of Georgia began to make its rapidly growing population of prisoners available for hire. The resulting convict leasing system ensnared not only men but also African American women, who were forced to labor in camps and factories to make profits for private investors. In this vivid work of history, Talitha L. LeFlouria draws from a rich array of primary sources to piece together the stories of these women, recounting what they endured in Georgia’s prison system and what their labor accomplished.